ICYMI: Moulton Knocked For "Breezy Dismissal" Of Driving Tax Concerns

BOSTON -- The Boston Herald editorial board today knocked Congressman Seth Moulton for his "breezy dismissal" of concerns over Beacon Hill Democrats' latest scheme to monitor and tax the miles that commuters drive. "It must be easy for an elected member of Congress who routinely flies to his job in Washington to embrace a tax on other people who have to drive to work every day, whether it’s 10 miles round trip or 100," writes the Herald

Editorial: Moulton misses on tax
BOSTON HERALD
By The Editorial Board
9/7/16  

It must be easy for an elected member of Congress who routinely flies to his job in Washington to embrace a tax on other people who have to drive to work every day, whether it’s 10 miles round trip or 100. U.S. Rep. Seth Moulton might want to reconsider his breezy dismissal of concerns about a possible tax on every mile driven by Bay State motorists.

In a Twitter post over the weekend Moulton linked to a Boston Globe editorial supportive of a study on the vehicle-miles-driven tax scheme, which Gov. Charlie Baker vetoed last month. Moulton called it “incredibly short-sighted” of Baker to “stifle innovation in transportation.”

“Innovation” in this case is code for a higher tax on people who happen to drive a lot — few of them, we’re guessing, for the pure pleasure of it.

Progressives love the idea of the miles-driven tax because it accomplishes several of their goals. It punishes evil carbon-polluters (aka people who drive). It makes up for a drop in revenue from the gas tax, which is the inconvenient result of more fuel-efficient vehicles. They insist it is the fairest way to fund highway repairs and maintenance, with the heaviest users of the roads paying the most.

But if the tax is ever adopted in Massachusetts we suspect it will be a supplement to the gas tax, rather than a substitute.

And we find it rather astonishing that progressives, who usually get the vapors at the thought of government invading their personal privacy, would embrace the idea of giving state bureaucrats the ability to track their every move behind the wheel.
...
Or perhaps if he were required — personally — to pay a tax for every airplane mile flown. 


(Click here for the full article)

###