Rosenberg: Senate Dems "Ever At The Ready" To Hike Taxes

BOSTON -- Senate Democrats are "ever at the ready" to hike taxes on working families, according to new comments from Senate President Stan Rosenberg today. Rosenberg added that the Senate had "some really good ideas" to raise new taxes in the future. 

"Senate President Rosenberg's admission that he's vigilantly looking for new ways to hike taxes reveals what we all knew: Beacon Hill Democrats just view working families as a constant source of more revenue for their spending sprees. Massachusetts taxpayers deserve leaders who are responsible with their money - an approach that Rosenberg and Senate Democrats have clearly chosen not to take." - MassGOP Chairman Kirsten Hughes

Senate leaders "ever at the ready" to weigh tax, revenue proposals"
STATE HOUSE NEWS SERVICE
By Matt Murphy
4/26/16

While he may be unlikely to get his chance in the coming months to alter the state's tax code, Senate President Stanley Rosenberg on Tuesday said Senate Democratic leaders are "ever at the ready" to consider ways to generate new revenue to prop up areas of government spending, including public higher education.
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"This is a revenue problem," Rosenberg told hosts Jim Braude and Margery Eagan.

Rosenberg predicted that on May 18 when House and Senate lawmakers consider a proposed constitutional amendment to tax high-income households a higher rate on earnings over $1 million that it will receive the necessary 50 votes to advance to the next legislative session.

The amendment, which would apply an additional 4 percent tax on income above $1 million, has been projected by the Department of Revenue to be able to generate an additional $1.9 billion in annual revenue to the state.
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"We have some really good ideas and we look for opportunity, but as you know we can't initiate tax bills in the Senate. We are ever at the ready with some really good ideas to make the tax system fairer," he said.

House Speaker Robert DeLeo and Gov. Charlie Baker have declared tax increases off the table this year, essentially hamstringing Senate lawmakers who would like to consider updates to the tax system that could help fund priority areas of the state budget.
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